How to profit from an AIDS denialist

December 12, 2009

Have I got a great investment opportunity for one of those AIDS apologists–someone who believes that any person testing positive for HIV antibodies will inevitably get AIDS and die in short order if they don’t take the drugs.

I have a life insurance policy that I can no longer afford to keep, and I’ve decided to cash it in while alive, rather than after I’m dead.  It is life insurance, after all.

I’ll give the details below, but here’s the gist of the offer:  I will sell my life insurance policy for a fraction of the death benefit value and in return I will pledge to never take ARVs (anti-retroviral drugs).  I’m willing to sign whatever legal document is required to protect the investor.

According to the orthodox view of HIV and AIDS, I have surely already exceeded the average life expectancy for an HIV-positive person who does not take AIDS drugs.  I’ve been poz for eleven years, since December, 1998.  I quit taking all HIV-related medications nearly seven years ago in February, 2003 and do not intend to take them again.  Actually, I have no idea how long someone is expected to live without the drugs, but know it isn’t supposed to be very long.  I can find no research willing to take a stab at current life expectancy without ARVs since last century, so anyone with that information is welcome to contact me.

This is a MetLife whole life policy with a face value of $88,000, current death benefit of $93,350, and an annual premium of $2,242.64.  There is an outstanding loan of about $8,500.

These types of policies used to be hot commodities for viatical settlement companies a decade ago, often paying up to 85% of face value, but have fallen out of favor since poz people are no longer dropping like flies.  Conventional wisdom attributes this improvement in longevity to ARVs, though some of us are finding out that we can live well without the drugs, provided we make the changes to our lifestyle necessary for good health.  AIDStruthers are adamant this isn’t possible.

I am not one of those rare “elite controllers” who have an undetectable viral load without ARVs.  I have a detectable viral load that bounces around.  My complete lab history can be seen right here on my blog.

If I’m wrong, I should be dead in a few years, right?  So a smart orthodox investor might be interested in buying my policy, paying the premiums and collecting the death benefit when I succumb to their theory.

Given those circumstances, and my willingness to forego any AIDS drugs, I think asking for 50% of the face value is a great bargain, but I might even be willing to negotiate an offer for less. I’ll payoff the loan from my portion of the sale, of course.  Assuming I live another five years (a preposterous assumption according to the AIDS orthodoxy), the investor will have contributed about $55,000 to collect more than a $93,000 payoff.

I’m also open to just about any other reasonable offer, minus the above pledge to never take ARVs, as I’m considering relinquishing the policy for the existing cash value (a pittance).  I’d love to do better and given the beliefs of so many AIDStruthers, I don’t see how one of them can pass up this opportunity to turn a goodly profit and have a chance to gloat at my demise at the same time!

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J Todd DeShong – Baylor Health’s online AIDS diagnostician – UPDATED

September 26, 2009

Normally I wouldn’t want to waste this much time or bandwidth on such a matter, but the questionable activities involved justify calling this insignificant gnat out.  He’s finally irritated me enough that I have to swat him.  Besides, I’m off my feet for a few days and have some extra time on my hands, or maybe it’s just a side effect of the  antibiotic.

The leg

I recently woke up with a sudden, acute bacterial infection in my left leg, the same leg that has had two DVT blood clots in three years and has a history of recurring and slow-healing sores.  The name for the condition that results in this type of skin problem in the leg is called venous insufficiency and the sores are venous ulcers.  It is not uncommon (unlike, say… Kaposi sarcoma).

I know what the problem is and I am aware of a treatment center I want to go to that offers a non-invasive and drug-free protocol that even Medicare is convinced helps.

I posted a picture of my leg, seeking opinions about using antibiotics to treat it, on the website AIDS Myth Exposed, which I help moderate. I  had some ulterior motives, as I wanted to see what members’ reaction would be, considering some them seem to be opposed to all allopathic interventions, regardless of circumstances. I expected a variety of responses and got some.

Unsolicited email diagnosis and digital sleuthing

J Todd DeShong, in over his head

J Todd DeShong, in over his head

I was pretty surprised when that post resulted in a comment on this, my personal blog, from an anti-“AIDS denialist” activist who is well known among some of us AIDS questioners for his taunting and abusive personality and caustic, even toxic writing style. I really wasn’t so much shocked that J Todd DeShong would email me with his “concern”  as I was amazed that he advised me from his workplace, Baylor Health Care Systems in Dallas, that I seek medical care for Kaposi sarcoma, a serious and rare cancer!

The IP address in question was included in the email WordPress forwards to me with every new comment, and it belongs to Baylor Health Care Systems.  This same IP address is one of, if not  the  most frequent visitor to the resistance is fruitful blog, according to statcounter.com, a tracking service I use. I’ve been curious for some time who this regular visitor to my blog might be. Now I know. (Hi Todd!)

DeShong has visited this blog from his work IP address at least Read the rest of this entry »


How I became a Taliban

February 22, 2009

silencedeath1I confess.

Lock me up, torture me and ship me off to some lawless land so you can shove embers under my fingernails and then stone me until I’m dead. I deserve that and worse. Maybe my corpse should be dragged across a stony field for good measure, the remains left for scavengers and vermin.

I confess that I have a lot of questions about HIV and AIDS. I admit that I have developed a well-earned distrust of the sloppy and possibly criminal “scientific research” behind the discovery of a virus. (also see here)

There is more than one name for people like me. The nicer ones include skeptic, dissident, questioner, rethinker. Those in the mainstream of AIDS who are threatened by questions, derisively call us “denialists”.

Denialist.

As in denying that Read the rest of this entry »