The slippery slope of AIDS drugs

December 18, 2009

pills and more pillsA review of this week’s list of research into current treatments for so-called HIV infection shows how patients seeking care in their doctor’s office can end up being on a long list of pharmaceutical drugs, mostly to treat the effects of ARVs (antiretroviral drugs).

There is a push to get more and more people on these drugs, regardless of whether they are actually presenting with any symptoms of illness. Some AIDS proponents even want healthy people with no positive test results to start taking the drugs, in the name of “prevention”.

The dangerous effects (there really is nothing “side” about them) of these drugs is downplayed.  We are told the new drugs are safe and effective, yet the research indicates otherwise.

One recently published study questioned which statin drug is best for treating dyslipidemia, the lipid disorder associated with disfiguring body changes known as lipodystrophy.  The answer was:  Crestor (rosuvastatin).

Fine.  Obviously AIDS drug researchers are admitting ARVs have serious unwanted effects.  Their answer to this problem?  More drugs, of course.

Unfortunately, the fix is also well known for having a long list of side effects.  Crestor is associated with so many damaging effects that I will only list the categories mentioned here:  musculoskeletal, renal, hepatic, respiratory, nervous system, psychiatric, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular,  endocrine, hematologic, dermatologic, genitourinary, hypersensitivity and “other”, which includes “flu syndrome”, infections, and a host of lab abnormalities!

Once a patient presents to his or her doctor with complaints from one of these drug-related effects, they are then prescribed additional drugs, which only adds to the momentum of ultimate drug abuse.

This is precisely how I ended up being on more than two dozen pharmaceutical drugs simultaneously, before quitting all of them in 2007.

Lipo is only one of the many complications poz people on HAART experience, and it may not be the worst one, but because its effects are so visible and disfiguring, patients will go to extremes to try to treat it.  Collagen implants for sunken cheeks and buttocks is a popular topic on the popular website aidsmeds.com, for example.

We have moved past the time when people were so ill from infections resulting from immune dysfunction that ARVs may have actually helped–the so-called “Lazurus effect”.  There may, in fact, be a role for such drastic intervention, but only in extreme cases.  To recommend lifelong chemotherapy to healthy people is beyond problematic, it is unethical.  AIDS proponents hate to hear it said, but those who benefit the most from this strategy are pharmaceutical companies and their investors.

Anyone facing the choice of taking AIDS drugs deserve access to all the information they need to make an informed choice.  No one should be pressured to do so when the evidence supporting their use is contradictory and the effects are so drastic.

More and more of us who are “poz” and have health problems are discovering we can extend our lives and improve the quality of our lives more effectively by consciously improving our health with lifestyle choices, rather than relying on drugs that ultimately create more new symptoms than they cure.

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Leg is better, thanks for asking

October 23, 2009

I just completed the third week of therapy for my left leg. A combination of compression therapy, using elastic bandages, and manual lymph drainage massage has produced some promising results. The swelling is gone, the infection has cleared and all the sores have healed… for the first time in years. I only wish now that I had resisted taking more antibiotics before doing this.

Now I am also facing a decision about continuing to take warfarin to “thin” my blood as a preventative against future clots.  I am having to frequently adjust my dosage and have yet to maintain a steady level, based on INR.  Some days my INR has been so high that it puts me at risk of internal bleeding.  Once again, I’m aware of the possibility that the “cure” is as bad as the potential illness.

I will continue to wear compression stockings and perform a set of exercises intended to stimulate my lymphatic system.

The scars of several years of painful sores remain to remind me of what I have been through. Hopefully, those too will fade with time and continued care.

I am extremely grateful to Dr. Cheryl Morgan, PhD and her staff at Therapy Concepts for their help and healing touch.

Before (9/24/09)

Before (9/24/09)

4 weeks later

4 weeks later


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J Todd DeShong – Baylor Health’s online AIDS diagnostician – UPDATED

September 26, 2009

Normally I wouldn’t want to waste this much time or bandwidth on such a matter, but the questionable activities involved justify calling this insignificant gnat out.  He’s finally irritated me enough that I have to swat him.  Besides, I’m off my feet for a few days and have some extra time on my hands, or maybe it’s just a side effect of the  antibiotic.

The leg

I recently woke up with a sudden, acute bacterial infection in my left leg, the same leg that has had two DVT blood clots in three years and has a history of recurring and slow-healing sores.  The name for the condition that results in this type of skin problem in the leg is called venous insufficiency and the sores are venous ulcers.  It is not uncommon (unlike, say… Kaposi sarcoma).

I know what the problem is and I am aware of a treatment center I want to go to that offers a non-invasive and drug-free protocol that even Medicare is convinced helps.

I posted a picture of my leg, seeking opinions about using antibiotics to treat it, on the website AIDS Myth Exposed, which I help moderate. I  had some ulterior motives, as I wanted to see what members’ reaction would be, considering some them seem to be opposed to all allopathic interventions, regardless of circumstances. I expected a variety of responses and got some.

Unsolicited email diagnosis and digital sleuthing

J Todd DeShong, in over his head

J Todd DeShong, in over his head

I was pretty surprised when that post resulted in a comment on this, my personal blog, from an anti-“AIDS denialist” activist who is well known among some of us AIDS questioners for his taunting and abusive personality and caustic, even toxic writing style. I really wasn’t so much shocked that J Todd DeShong would email me with his “concern”  as I was amazed that he advised me from his workplace, Baylor Health Care Systems in Dallas, that I seek medical care for Kaposi sarcoma, a serious and rare cancer!

The IP address in question was included in the email WordPress forwards to me with every new comment, and it belongs to Baylor Health Care Systems.  This same IP address is one of, if not  the  most frequent visitor to the resistance is fruitful blog, according to statcounter.com, a tracking service I use. I’ve been curious for some time who this regular visitor to my blog might be. Now I know. (Hi Todd!)

DeShong has visited this blog from his work IP address at least Read the rest of this entry »


Rethinking AIDS Day

April 23, 2009

April 23 is Rethinking AIDS Day. Good thing someone decided such a day is needed, because I’ve been  procrastinating and struggling to write the “AIDS Dissidence 101” post for Open Salon, where I also blog, that several people there have requested for quite some time now. One of the biggest problem I’ve encountered is trying to address the many issues raised by this debate in a format and length that will be read.

I also realized quickly that what I would want to share has already been written elsewhere. There have been more than 50 books written challenging various aspects of the AIDS hypothesis. A list of them can be found at AIDSwiki. In addition, there are at least as many websites, many of them listed on the blogroll on the right.

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THE ROTTED CORNERSTONE: Robert Gallo


When the cause of the first few cases of immune collapse in a handful of gay men was first being examined in the early 1980s, numerous viable theories were considered: infection with cytomegalovirus, the use of amyl nitrite or butyl nitrate poppers, and immune overload from a “fast track” lifestyle that included multiple STDs and prescription drugs, to name a few.

These men were not “previously healthy”, as described by the CDC in the first public announcement of a new immune deficiency in gay men and there are many possible reasons they got sick and died. Research into all possible causes other than a virus were squashed once U.S. Secretary of Health Margaret Heckler announced in 1983 that Robert Gallo had discovered the virus that causes AIDS.

Gallo’s never isolated the virus he claims to have discovered. His research involved mixing lymph tissue from ten gay men with the then known symptoms for AIDS, stimulating them with chemicals in order to get something to grow in cell cultures from leukemia patients! This “soup” became the basis for HIV-antibody tests, diagnoses and treatment1,2

Incredibly, the scientific community never took the time to verify Gallo’s claim then and nearly all subsequent research is built on his word. Gallo has since proven Read the rest of this entry »


I’m positive

March 10, 2009

More than ten years ago I wrote about what I was thinking and feeling immediately after I got my diagnosis of “HIV-positive”.

Believe nothing - Buddha

What I wrote then shows how I was once a fervent believer in the mainstream AIDS cult. Since then I have come to a dissident perspective on my own, and was actually surprised to learn there is a community of people who, like me, were questioning everything we’ve been told.

This was but the first chapter in one volume of my life story. For first time visitors, please be sure to also read How I survived AIDS without drugs to understand just how much my beliefs have changed.


December 22, 1998
Early morning

It finally happened.

After 15(?) years of wondering and thinking about it, I’ve finally turned HIV-positive. All those anxious times in waiting rooms waiting for testing results. Assuming I had to have it, only to find out I was still negative. I’ve imagined this a thousand times before. I feel like a well-rehearsed stand-in actor who after so many years of waiting to be—but never being—called on stage, learns suddenly and unexpectedly that he’s ‘on’. Now.

How many times have I Read the rest of this entry »


“Reduce the burden” is focus of new website

February 27, 2009

There is a new website online for those questioning the mainstream AIDS hypothesis, and I’m impressed.

reducetheburden.org is a veritable warehouse of research documentation from dozens, perhaps hundreds of sources ranging from Natural News to the AP, challenging the status quo about AIDS and making it a bookmark site for anyone confronting a chronic disease.

Here is how RTB describes itself on the homepage:

RTB is an idea, a website, and a social movement whose aim is to improve the lives of Aids patients worldwide, by improving understanding of the over-simplified and often incorrect publicly advertised Aids diagnosis.

screenshot from reducetheburden.org

screenshot from reducetheburden.org

RTB avoids getting bogged down Read the rest of this entry »


How I became a Taliban

February 22, 2009

silencedeath1I confess.

Lock me up, torture me and ship me off to some lawless land so you can shove embers under my fingernails and then stone me until I’m dead. I deserve that and worse. Maybe my corpse should be dragged across a stony field for good measure, the remains left for scavengers and vermin.

I confess that I have a lot of questions about HIV and AIDS. I admit that I have developed a well-earned distrust of the sloppy and possibly criminal “scientific research” behind the discovery of a virus. (also see here)

There is more than one name for people like me. The nicer ones include skeptic, dissident, questioner, rethinker. Those in the mainstream of AIDS who are threatened by questions, derisively call us “denialists”.

Denialist.

As in denying that Read the rest of this entry »