The slippery slope of AIDS drugs

December 18, 2009

pills and more pillsA review of this week’s list of research into current treatments for so-called HIV infection shows how patients seeking care in their doctor’s office can end up being on a long list of pharmaceutical drugs, mostly to treat the effects of ARVs (antiretroviral drugs).

There is a push to get more and more people on these drugs, regardless of whether they are actually presenting with any symptoms of illness. Some AIDS proponents even want healthy people with no positive test results to start taking the drugs, in the name of “prevention”.

The dangerous effects (there really is nothing “side” about them) of these drugs is downplayed.  We are told the new drugs are safe and effective, yet the research indicates otherwise.

One recently published study questioned which statin drug is best for treating dyslipidemia, the lipid disorder associated with disfiguring body changes known as lipodystrophy.  The answer was:  Crestor (rosuvastatin).

Fine.  Obviously AIDS drug researchers are admitting ARVs have serious unwanted effects.  Their answer to this problem?  More drugs, of course.

Unfortunately, the fix is also well known for having a long list of side effects.  Crestor is associated with so many damaging effects that I will only list the categories mentioned here:  musculoskeletal, renal, hepatic, respiratory, nervous system, psychiatric, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular,  endocrine, hematologic, dermatologic, genitourinary, hypersensitivity and “other”, which includes “flu syndrome”, infections, and a host of lab abnormalities!

Once a patient presents to his or her doctor with complaints from one of these drug-related effects, they are then prescribed additional drugs, which only adds to the momentum of ultimate drug abuse.

This is precisely how I ended up being on more than two dozen pharmaceutical drugs simultaneously, before quitting all of them in 2007.

Lipo is only one of the many complications poz people on HAART experience, and it may not be the worst one, but because its effects are so visible and disfiguring, patients will go to extremes to try to treat it.  Collagen implants for sunken cheeks and buttocks is a popular topic on the popular website aidsmeds.com, for example.

We have moved past the time when people were so ill from infections resulting from immune dysfunction that ARVs may have actually helped–the so-called “Lazurus effect”.  There may, in fact, be a role for such drastic intervention, but only in extreme cases.  To recommend lifelong chemotherapy to healthy people is beyond problematic, it is unethical.  AIDS proponents hate to hear it said, but those who benefit the most from this strategy are pharmaceutical companies and their investors.

Anyone facing the choice of taking AIDS drugs deserve access to all the information they need to make an informed choice.  No one should be pressured to do so when the evidence supporting their use is contradictory and the effects are so drastic.

More and more of us who are “poz” and have health problems are discovering we can extend our lives and improve the quality of our lives more effectively by consciously improving our health with lifestyle choices, rather than relying on drugs that ultimately create more new symptoms than they cure.

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Rabid fox no match for AIDS dissident

December 16, 2009

KC Star cutlineKeep reading to find out why I just could not resist the headline.  But first, there is a little discussion about AIDS vaccine research I need to get out of the way.

I did a double take when I saw this report promising “further progress” in the search for an AIDS vaccine.  Don’t worry, I will explain in a second what this has to do with rabid foxes.

AIDS vaccine research: FAIL

We’ve been hearing these types of “promising reports” for more than a decade now, but for some reason, an effective “AIDS vaccine” continues to elude researchers.

Their excuses for failure mutate as rapidly as the virus allegedly does.

What does rabies have to do with AIDS?

What caught my attention about this particular study report was that researchers are using the rabies virus to create their vaccine.

Why use the rabies virus?  Why use any virus other than the HI virus?  After all, we are told that HIV has been isolated, analyzed and decoded in its many various strains.  Why would AIDS be so different from other vaccine research, which uses the suspect virus in an inactivated, or weakened form, as in the rabies vaccine itself, for example?

Simple questions do not require complex answers

I am sure They have an answer.  They always do.  Sometimes They just don’t make sense. To add insult to injury, They tell us that this kind of research involves such complexity that the average person is simply incapable of understanding the “science” behind it.

Hey… I’m no rocket scientist, but I can grasp the concepts that propel a space shuttle into orbit.  I grok the physics that keep an airplane suspended. I even understand the basic concept of how electronic switches are set to “on” or “off” (represented by 0’s and 1’s), to generate this digital page you are reading.

Give us a break.  A shell game artist also relies on “complexity”, as well as quickly moving the target to confuse onlookers. It is a really lame excuse for explaining failure, if you ask me.

Time to redefine “progress”

How can AIDS vaccine researchers claim “progress” when the study authors themselves admit “the long-term benefits were minimal?”

And finally, please explain to me the significance of this finding:

“Although we can’t yet block the infection, we showed that we can protect against disease,” said Dr. Schnell. “We also saw significant antibody activity against the virus, which is promising. In addition, this is a very simple approach that only took two immunizations.”

I thought antibodies to HIV indicated infection, which this vaccine cannot block.  Yet these researchers note “significant antibody activity against the virus”.  Say what?  Either antibodies are effective or they are not.  You can’t have it both ways, fellas.

Studies like this one only cast even more doubt on the very existence of the so-called HI virus, or the value of continuing to follow inane theories that are based on a crumbling foundation of flawed and fraudulent findings.  It is long past time to spend some of those big bucks on re-evaluating the very foundation of AIDS “science”.

If the HI virus does not even exist–and I grow increasingly skeptical that it does with every study like this I read–why is it so difficult to imagine that the human body is quite often capable of mounting an adequate response to the other probable cause(s) of immune dysfunction, provided measures are taken to restore overall health?

You promised a story about rabid foxes!

Yes, I digressed.  The other reason this report caught my attention is because I am one of those rare people to have actually been exposed to that other  “fatal disease”: rabies.

That’s right.  I had a personal encounter with rabies in upstate New York in 1990, when I was bit by a rabid red fox while building a deck for some friends.  I’ve recently scanned copies of the newspaper reports of that event and have been waiting for just the right opportunity to share this little tale from my past.

Now, thanks to AIDS vaccine research, I have the perfect opportunity.

Read here:

Rabies Suspected:  Red Fox Terrorizes Hankins Residents
(Sullivan County Democrat, August 31, 1990)

Or read the more humorous version from the Kansas City Star:

A furry ball of fury turns man’s getaway into battle for survival
(Kansas City Star, September 3, 1990)

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Leg is better, thanks for asking

October 23, 2009

I just completed the third week of therapy for my left leg. A combination of compression therapy, using elastic bandages, and manual lymph drainage massage has produced some promising results. The swelling is gone, the infection has cleared and all the sores have healed… for the first time in years. I only wish now that I had resisted taking more antibiotics before doing this.

Now I am also facing a decision about continuing to take warfarin to “thin” my blood as a preventative against future clots.  I am having to frequently adjust my dosage and have yet to maintain a steady level, based on INR.  Some days my INR has been so high that it puts me at risk of internal bleeding.  Once again, I’m aware of the possibility that the “cure” is as bad as the potential illness.

I will continue to wear compression stockings and perform a set of exercises intended to stimulate my lymphatic system.

The scars of several years of painful sores remain to remind me of what I have been through. Hopefully, those too will fade with time and continued care.

I am extremely grateful to Dr. Cheryl Morgan, PhD and her staff at Therapy Concepts for their help and healing touch.

Before (9/24/09)

Before (9/24/09)

4 weeks later

4 weeks later


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J Todd DeShong – Baylor Health’s online AIDS diagnostician – UPDATED

September 26, 2009

Normally I wouldn’t want to waste this much time or bandwidth on such a matter, but the questionable activities involved justify calling this insignificant gnat out.  He’s finally irritated me enough that I have to swat him.  Besides, I’m off my feet for a few days and have some extra time on my hands, or maybe it’s just a side effect of the  antibiotic.

The leg

I recently woke up with a sudden, acute bacterial infection in my left leg, the same leg that has had two DVT blood clots in three years and has a history of recurring and slow-healing sores.  The name for the condition that results in this type of skin problem in the leg is called venous insufficiency and the sores are venous ulcers.  It is not uncommon (unlike, say… Kaposi sarcoma).

I know what the problem is and I am aware of a treatment center I want to go to that offers a non-invasive and drug-free protocol that even Medicare is convinced helps.

I posted a picture of my leg, seeking opinions about using antibiotics to treat it, on the website AIDS Myth Exposed, which I help moderate. I  had some ulterior motives, as I wanted to see what members’ reaction would be, considering some them seem to be opposed to all allopathic interventions, regardless of circumstances. I expected a variety of responses and got some.

Unsolicited email diagnosis and digital sleuthing

J Todd DeShong, in over his head

J Todd DeShong, in over his head

I was pretty surprised when that post resulted in a comment on this, my personal blog, from an anti-“AIDS denialist” activist who is well known among some of us AIDS questioners for his taunting and abusive personality and caustic, even toxic writing style. I really wasn’t so much shocked that J Todd DeShong would email me with his “concern”  as I was amazed that he advised me from his workplace, Baylor Health Care Systems in Dallas, that I seek medical care for Kaposi sarcoma, a serious and rare cancer!

The IP address in question was included in the email WordPress forwards to me with every new comment, and it belongs to Baylor Health Care Systems.  This same IP address is one of, if not  the  most frequent visitor to the resistance is fruitful blog, according to statcounter.com, a tracking service I use. I’ve been curious for some time who this regular visitor to my blog might be. Now I know. (Hi Todd!)

DeShong has visited this blog from his work IP address at least Read the rest of this entry »


New webcam for youtube videos

July 15, 2009

I just posted a new video on youtube, discussing the LOTTI study I blogged about yesterday. Video is a new medium for me and I had such a positive response from my first video that I hope it helps get this message of hope out to more people.

This second video has far higher quality, thanks to a better webcam.  Thank you, Michael!

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LOTTI: Take a vacation from AIDS drugs

July 13, 2009
Basket full of AIDS meds

Wastebasket full of meds

Start memorizing this acronym: LOTTI. It could change your life if you are on one of the AIDS drug cocktails, also known as HAART (highly active anti-retroviral therapy).

LOTTI stands for the LOng Term Treatment Interruption study, which recently reported that those of us who have had success with “treatment interruption” might not be all that unusual.

Although some results from the LOTTI study were first reported back in November, 2008, the complete report wasn’t published in the journal AIDS until April and didn’t hit my radar screen until this month, when it was finally published on Medscape.  In an industry that often falls over itself rushing to trumpet breaking news to the media, this sluggishness to report good news (for people on HAART, if not the pharmaceutical industry) is certainly suspect.

Good News! Drug vacations DO work!

The randomized, controlled, prospective  LOTTI study concludes that those patients who took vacations from their HAART drugs fared as well clinically as those who took their drug cocktail continuously. “The two strategies may be considered clinically equivalent,” stated the study’s authors. Even more importantly (though not emphasized in the report): more than a fourth of those who quit their cocktail of drugs never had to restart them, even though the mean length of time in the study was more than four years!

What is so exciting about this scientifically controlled study is that it offers hope to those who are currently taking anti-retroviral (ARV) drugs, but are concerned about long term effects, or are already experiencing illness because of toxicity. Based on the study’s results, there are not only no good reasons for HAART patients to stay on the drugs continuously and indefinitely, there are several advantages to stopping them: Read the rest of this entry »


Rethinking AIDS Day

April 23, 2009

April 23 is Rethinking AIDS Day. Good thing someone decided such a day is needed, because I’ve been  procrastinating and struggling to write the “AIDS Dissidence 101” post for Open Salon, where I also blog, that several people there have requested for quite some time now. One of the biggest problem I’ve encountered is trying to address the many issues raised by this debate in a format and length that will be read.

I also realized quickly that what I would want to share has already been written elsewhere. There have been more than 50 books written challenging various aspects of the AIDS hypothesis. A list of them can be found at AIDSwiki. In addition, there are at least as many websites, many of them listed on the blogroll on the right.

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THE ROTTED CORNERSTONE: Robert Gallo


When the cause of the first few cases of immune collapse in a handful of gay men was first being examined in the early 1980s, numerous viable theories were considered: infection with cytomegalovirus, the use of amyl nitrite or butyl nitrate poppers, and immune overload from a “fast track” lifestyle that included multiple STDs and prescription drugs, to name a few.

These men were not “previously healthy”, as described by the CDC in the first public announcement of a new immune deficiency in gay men and there are many possible reasons they got sick and died. Research into all possible causes other than a virus were squashed once U.S. Secretary of Health Margaret Heckler announced in 1983 that Robert Gallo had discovered the virus that causes AIDS.

Gallo’s never isolated the virus he claims to have discovered. His research involved mixing lymph tissue from ten gay men with the then known symptoms for AIDS, stimulating them with chemicals in order to get something to grow in cell cultures from leukemia patients! This “soup” became the basis for HIV-antibody tests, diagnoses and treatment1,2

Incredibly, the scientific community never took the time to verify Gallo’s claim then and nearly all subsequent research is built on his word. Gallo has since proven Read the rest of this entry »